Born To Say Goodbye

by The Disappearing Act

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about

Born to Say Goodbye is the second offering from the Nourallah (Dallas) and Blumenfeld (El Paso) musical partnership. With this LP, The Disappearing Act’s creative trajectory evolves toward the unconventional as evinced in atmosphere of synthetic beats, loops and electronic sounds that dot an essentially acoustic guitar landscape. More than anything, with this recording, he band has created a painfully personal masterpiece, with an almost ear-to-the-wall intimate atmosphere that permeates the ten-song collection, each chronicling the dissolution of Nourallah’s marriage.

Some of the album’s most riveting moments are steeped in what we would call “Beatles aficionado aesthetics.” The tracks “Holiday” and “Misery Maker” are the two most Beatles-esque songs, the latter boasting Ringo-ish drums, reverse tape effects and a vocal with raga-fied melismatic turns. Although the sonic glue that holds the album together is Blumenfeld’s acoustic guitar, dashes of Mellotron flutes, drum loops, analog synths, strings, either actual or mimicked by bowed guitar strings, add at least half a teaspoon of psychedelic frippery to the recipe.

The album started with Blumenfeld in El Paso, cutting instrumental guitar tracks and adding synthetic beats into the mix. He sent “mountains of stuff” to Nourallah in Dallas, and when the music spoke to him he’d respond with lyrics. “I’d come out to my studio when I was feeling particularly emotionally beat-up from what I was going through in my life and just sit down with the tracks,” Nourallah says. “I never put pen to paper to write the words; basically it was all free association. . . .It’s definitely different than any other project I’ve ever worked on.”

credits

released October 9, 2015

Salim Nourallah: Vocals/Bass/Lyrics/Keyboards/Producer
Bob Blumenfeld: Acoustic Guitar/Composer
Nick Earl: Electric Guitar/Guitar Effects
John Leffler: Electric Guitar/Acoustic Guitar/Keyboards
Gabe Gonzalez: Synthetic Beat Programming/Production
John Dufilho: Drums/Percussion
Tristan Tully: Electronic Beats (Holiday)
Rick Nelson: Strings (Invisible)
Mike Hodges: Electronic Percussion (Failure Complete)
Nigel Newton: Vibraphone (You and Me, Holiday, Failure Complete)
Rip Rowan: Keyboards (Song 49)

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about

The Disappearing Act El Paso, Texas

The Disappearing Act—a magic trick? An illusion? Maybe a band? Ambiguous though it may be, The Disappearing Act could be roughly defined as a recording partnership between two songwriting friends, Dallas’s Salim Nourallah and El Paso’s Bob Blumenfeld.

The Disappearing Act has released two albums to date, 2011’s The Disappearing Act and 2015's Born to Say Goodbye.
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